Fertility

The Top 100 Greek Gods and Goddesses: Names & Powers

Updated on 26 August 2021 • 16 minute read
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Overview

Are you familiar with some stories of Greek gods and goddesses?

Many of us know about Zeus, Hercules, Aphrodite, Hades, and Poseidon. But there are dozens of other gods and goddesses that may not be famous but still figured in great stories. 

Some of them might have the qualities you’re looking for or names that could be a nice choice for your baby.

According to Greek mythology, in the beginning, there was only Chaos, the primeval god who’s also the personification of the gaping emptiness. From this void sprang other primordial deities: Eros (Love), Gaia (Earth), and Tartarus (the Underworld).

Gaia created Uranus (god of heavens) and became his wife. The two were the parents of the pre-Olympian gods called the twelve Titans. They also had other children: the Cyclops (circle-eyed beings) and the Hecatoncheires (the hundred-handed ones).

Uranus thought that the Hecatoncheires and the Cyclops were too ugly and powerful, so he imprisoned them in the depths of the Underworld.

Furious, Gaia rallied her other children, the Titans, to help her take revenge. Many of the Titans were scared of their father, except the youngest named Cronus.

With the help of the pillar gods from the four corners of the Earth, Cronus trapped his father and cut his genitals. The incident separated heaven (Uranus) and Earth (Gaia).

Amazingly, the blood that dripped out of Uranus and dropped on Gaia gave rise to new beings: 

  • the Giants (aggressive and large)
  • the Meliai (beautiful nymphs)
  • the Erinyes (deities of vengeance)

 

His genitals dropped to the sea, becoming foam that turned into the goddess Aphrodite

With Uranus’ defeat, the Titans ruled and became the new Greek gods.

But their rule did not last forever because they were also overthrown by their children, who would later become known as the gods of Mount Olympus.

These gods were identified as Zeus, Hera, Apollo, Aphrodite, Ares, Artemis, Athena, Demeter, Hephaestus, Hermes, Poseidon, and Dionysus

Also called the “Greek pantheon,” this new batch of deities became more famous than their predecessors. They were the subject of many Greek myths, stories, and other literary works by writers, such as Homer.

You can find more interesting stories below to help you choose your baby’s name from these Greek gods and goddesses.

 

Greek Gods

The gods and goddesses of the Greek pantheon were also known as “the 12 Olympian Gods,” mostly because they lived on Mount Olympus.

But according to legend, the gods did not stay on the sacred mountain. Instead, they regularly mingled with the mortals and even had demigod offspring with some humans.

Notably, the ancient Greeks didn’t limit their worship to these Olympian deities because there were many others. Though they were lesser gods, the Greeks still considered them as important and worshipped them, too.

Many people think that Odysseus, the hero of Homer‘s epic poem, “The Odyssey,” was a Greek god. This legendary Greek king of Ithaca captured Troy with the wooden horse. He achieved many feats, but he was never elevated from a mortal to a god.

Some Greek gods and their stories might inspire you to choose their names for your baby.

 

Achilles

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Greatest warrior of the Trojan War
  • Description: He’s the demigod son of Peleus (king of the Myrmidons and Zeus’ grandson) and Thetis (a sea nymph).
  • His story appears in Homer’s “Iliad,” where he’s recognized as the main hero.

 

Aeolus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: King of the mythical island of Aiolia (Aeolia) and divine keeper of the winds
  • Variations/Synonyms: Aiolos
  • Description: He keeps the violent storm winds locked on the island. The winds are only released to wreak devastation upon the world, with the command from the great gods.

 

Aether

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of light
  • Variations/Synonyms: The Upper Sky
  • Description: He’s responsible for the spark of life in every creature.

 

Aion

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of eternity
  • Variations/Synonyms: “Αion” also means “century” in Greek.
  • Description: He’s portrayed as a monster with a snake body.  Instead of one, he had three heads: a man, a lion, and a bull.
  • He’s sometimes confused with Cronos, the god of time. But the “time” for Aion is associated with eternity, not linear time.

 

Alastor

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of family feuds
  • Variations/Synonyms: Avenger of evil deeds
  • Description: He’s considered as an epithet (a byname) of Zeus

 

Apollo

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of light, healing and prophecy, and music and poetry
  • Variations/Synonyms: Apollon, Apulu, or Phoebus
  • Description: He’s one of the most important and famous of the Greek gods. He’s the twin brother of Artemis, born to Zeus and Titan goddess Leto.
  • According to legend, he’s the teacher of the nine beautiful Muses. He would accompany them with his famous lyre when they sing.

 

Ares

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of war
  • Variations/Synonyms: Enyalius, Mars, or Aries
  • Description: The son of Zeus and Hera, this Olympian god had two faithful sons: Phobos and Deimos.
  • Though he’s handsome and strong, people hated Ares because of his love for war and battles. According to legend, Ares was tried for his war crimes on the Areopagus Hill in Athens. The place would later become ancient Greece’s seat of the criminal court.

 

Asclepius

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of medicine
  • Variations/Synonyms: Asklepios (Greek) or Aesculapius (Latin)
  • Description: He’s the demigod son of Apollo with the mortal princess Coronis.
  • He learned the art of healing from Chiron, a Centaur.

 

Atlas

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Bearer of the heavens
  • Variations/Synonyms: Atlaô
  • Description: He’s the strongest of the Titans and has four arms. He supported Cronus amid the uprising led by Zeus. After defeating the Titans, Zeus punished Atlas by making him carry the world on his back.

 

Attis

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of fruits of the earth, vegetation, and rebirth
  • Description: He’s a minor god known to be the consort of Cybele (the Earth goddess).

 

Boreas

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of the cold north wind
  • Variations/Synonyms: Bringer of winter
  • Description: He’s an Anemoi (wind god) who’s the personification of the north wind.

 

Caerus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of opportunity, favorable moments, and luck
  • Variations/Synonyms: Kairos, Occasio, or Tempus
  • Description: He’s a minor god.

 

Coeus

  • Origin: Ancient Greek
  • Meaning: Titan god of intelligence
  • Variations/Synonyms: Koios
  • Description: He’s the father of Leto and husband of Phoebe.

 

Crius

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan god of heavenly constellations
  • Variations/Synonyms: Crios or Krios
  • Description: He’s the Titan associated with the start of each season. His name also means “ram” (male sheep).

 

Cronos

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of time
  • Variations/Synonyms: Chronus, Khronos, or Chronos
  • Description: He’s also known as “Father Time” but is often confused with Titan leader Cronus because of the similarities in their name.

 

Cronus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: King of the Titans
  • Variations/Synonyms: Kronus or Saturn (Roman version)
  • Description: He’s the youngest of the Titans but became their leader after overthrowing their father, Uranus. Because he cut his father’s genitals with a scythe, he is often depicted carrying one in medieval art.

 

Deimos

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of dread and terror 
  • Variations/Synonyms: Formido or Metus (Roman)
  • Description: He’s the son of Ares and Aphrodite and is known as the personification of dread and terror.

 

Dinlas

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of chaos and hatred
  • Variations/Synonyms: Guardian god of Lamark
  • Description: He is the son of Ares and Aphrodite but was thrown to the Underworld because of his mother’s rejection. Hades decided to raise him as his son.
  • He would later become the guardian god of Lamark, an ancient city where wounded heroes are healed after battles.

 

Dionysus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of wine
  • Variations/Synonyms: Bacchus (Roman), Dionysos, or Liber
  • Description: He’s the demigod son of Zeus and Semele (a mortal).
  • Though he’s a demigod, he earned his place as one of the Olympian gods after winning the other gods’ hearts.

 

Epimetheus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of afterthought and excuses
  • Description: Zeus tasked him and his brother Prometheus to create mankind and animals. But he quickly used up the supply of gifts on animals, leaving Prometheus with no choice but to steal fire from heaven to arm his creation, mankind. The furious Zeus sent Pandora, the first woman, to become his wife and deliver evil to Earth.

 

Erebus 

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of darkness
  • Variations/Synonyms: Érebos or Scotus (Roman)
  • Description: He’s the son of Chaos and the consort of his sister Nyx (Night).

 

Eros

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of love and fertility
  • Variations/Synonyms: Amor, Cupid (Roman), or Eleutherios
  • Description: He had the power to cause lust and infatuation on anyone, god or mortal alike.

 

Eurus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of the unlucky east wind
  • Variations/Synonyms: Euros or Vulturnus (Roman)
  • Description: He’s one of the Anemoi (wind gods) and is referred to as “The East Wind.”

 

Glaucus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: A god of the sea
  • Variations/Synonyms: Glacus or Glaukos
  • Description: He was a mortal fisherman who became a sea god after eating a magical herb. He grew fins and a fishtail, similar to a merman but was gladly accepted by ocean deities Oceanus and Tethys.

 

Hades 

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of death and the Underworld
  • Variations/Synonyms: Pluto (Roman), Pluton, or Plotus
  • Description: He’s the son of Titans Cronus and Rhea. He got dominion of the Underworld after drawing lots with his brothers Zeus (heavens) and Poseidon (seas) when they had successfully overthrown their father.

 

Helios

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan god of the sun
  • Description: He’s also the personification of the sun. He’s often depicted riding a chariot, dragging the sun across the sky.

 

Hephaestus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of fire and blacksmiths
  • Description: He’s one of the Olympians, but his mother (Hera) threw him out of Mt. Olympus because she hated his ugly face and couldn’t nurse him. He was raised by the Nereids (sea nymphs) and later became a skillful blacksmith.
  • According to legend, he sent his mother a golden throne that bound her with invisible chains. The other gods were only able to untie Hera after getting Hephaestus drunk.

 

Heracles

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of heroes, athletes, sports, health, fertility, trade, and oracles
  • Variations/Synonyms: Hercules (Roman) or Herakles
  • Description: He’s the greatest of the Greek heroes and known as the divine protector of mankind.
  • He’s also the strongest man on Earth and was turned immortal upon his death.

 

Hermes

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of wealth, trade, travelers, and thieves
  • Description: He’s one of the Olympians and is known as the messenger of the gods.
  • He’s the mischievous and arrogant son of Zeus and Maia.
  • According to legend, he invented the lyre by putting strings on a turtle’s shell. Later, he would gift this lyre to appease Apollo after stealing his oxen and locking them in a cave.

 

Hymenaios

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of marriage ceremonies, songs, and inspiring feasts
  • Variations/Synonyms: Hymen or Talasius (Roman)
  • Description: His name comes from the refrain of an ancient marriage song.

 

Hyperion

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan of light
  • Variations/Synonyms: The High One
  • Description: He’s also known as the father of the sun, moon, and the dawn.

 

Hypnos

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of sleep 
  • Variations/Synonyms: Somnus or Sopor (Roman)
  • Description: He’s the twin brother of Thanatos (Death) and the son of Nyx (Night).

 

Iapetus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan god of mortal life
  • Description: He’s the personification of the west pillar of the Earth
  • With his brothers (Crius, Coeus, and Hyperion) who represented the other pillars, they trapped Uranus in place to let Cronus castrate him with a sickle.

 

Kratos

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of strength and power
  • Variations/Synonyms: Cratos
  • Description: He’s the divine personification of strength.

 

Morpheus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of dreams and sleep
  • Description: He’s known as the dream messenger of the gods, sending divine messages through stories and images in dreams.

 

Nereus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan god of the sea
  • Variations/Synonyms: Old Man of the Sea (coined by Homer)
  • Description: He’s the father of the Nereids (sea nymphs).

 

Notus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of the south wind
  • Variations/Synonyms: The South Wind
  • Description: He’s an Anemoi (wind god) who brings hot winds from the south and is feared as the destroyer of crops.

 

Oceanus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan god of the ocean
  • Variations/Synonyms: Okeanus
  • Description: He personifies the sea.
  • He and his sister, Titan Tethys, had numerous children called the Oceanids and the river gods. But they were so fertile that the overproduction of aqueous elements caused many floods. So, the two decided to divorce to save the world.

 

Pallas

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan god of battle and warcraft
  • Description: He’s the father of Kratos (Strength), Bia (Power), Nike (Victory), and Zelos (Rivalry).

 

Pan

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of the wild, goatherds and shepherds, and rustic music
  • Variations/Synonyms: Faunus (Roman)
  • Description: He’s the son of Hermes and is known for having a mostly human appearance but with goat feet and horns.

 

Perseus 

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Slayer of the Gorgon Medusa
  • Description: He’s the demigod son of Zeus with the mortal Danae.
  • He’s famous for killing the terrible monster known as the Gorgon Medusa, who had snakes for hair and turned anyone to stone if they looked into her eyes.

 

Pontus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Pre-Olympian god of the sea
  • Variations/Synonyms: Father of the sea creatures
  • Description: According to legend, he was Gaia’s son, but he didn’t have a father. But other myths name Aether (Upper Sky) as his father. 

 

Poseidon

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of the sea
  • Variations/Synonyms: Neptune (Roman) or Neptunus (Latin)
  • Description: He’s originally known as the god of freshwater but later considered the god of the sea.
  • This Olympian god has a trident as his main symbol and weapon.

 

Prometheus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan god of fire, forethought, and crafty counsel
  • Description: He’s known as the supreme trickster.
  • He’s credited with creating humans from clay and stealing fire from heaven to equip his creation.

 

Tartarus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Original god of the Underworld
  • Variations/Synonyms: Tartaros
  • Description: He’s one of the primordial gods.
  • He wasn’t just the god of the darkest, deepest part of the Underworld but was the pit itself.

 

Thanatos

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of death (non-violent death)
  • Variations/Synonyms: Letum or Mors (Roman)
  • Description: He’s the twin brother of Hypnos (Sleep) and is the personification of death.

 

Typhon

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of the storms, volcanoes, and monsters
  • Variations/Synonyms: Typhaon, Typhoeus, or Typhus
  • Description: He’s the personification of volcanic forces and was described as the most fearsome serpentine giant.
  • He dared to challenge Zeus for control over Mount Olympus.

 

Uranus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Original god of the heavens and ruler of the world
  • Variations/Synonyms: Caelus (Roman)
  • Description: He’s the son of Gaia but would become her husband. They became parents to the Titans.
  • He’s the personification of heaven and was the original sky god before getting overthrown by his children.

 

Zephyrus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: God of the west wind
  • Variations/Synonyms: Zephyr or Zéphyros
  • Description: He’s the gentlest of all the Anemoi (wind gods) and is known to be the messenger of spring.

 

Zeus

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Olympian god of the sky
  • Variations/Synonyms: Jupiter (Roman)
  • Description: He’s the chief deity, king of the gods, and the god of the sky and thunder. He won these titles after leading the Olympians in the coup against their dad, Cronus.
  • He’s often depicted as an old man holding a lightning bolt.

 

Greek Goddesses

In Greek mythology, the gods were able to procreate without a woman. But that didn’t make the goddesses less important. Many were powerful in their own right and could also have offspring without men.

For example, legends tell of how Gaia (Earth) created Uranus (Heaven) by herself. However, other legends say that Uranus was born from the union of Gaia and Aether.

You can find other interesting stories about Greek goddesses below to help you choose a Greek name for your baby girl:

 

Achlys

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of the eternal night
  • Variations/Synonyms: Demon of death
  • Description: According to legend, she existed before Chaos himself.

 

Aglaia

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of splendor, beauty, glory, adornment, and magnificence
  • Variations/Synonyms: Aglaea 
  • Description: She’s the youngest of the three Graces, the daughters of Zeus and Eurynome. They were beautiful women known for dancing and singing for the gods.

 

Alecto

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Erinye of unceasing anger
  • Variations/Synonyms: Allecto 
  • Description: She’s one of the three Erinyes (Furies), known as the goddesses of vengeance and retribution. They were born from Gaia and the blood of the castrated Uranus.

 

Ananke

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Primordial goddess of inevitability, necessity, and compulsion
  • Variations/Synonyms: Adrastea or Necessitas (Roman)
  • Description: Though she’s not a famous goddess, she’s known as the first goddess to have power over fate.

 

Aphrodite

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of love, fertility, and beauty
  • Variations/Synonyms: Venus (Roman)
  • Description: She has a magical belt that causes others to fall in love with whoever wears it.

 

Artemis

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Olympian goddess of the hunt and wild animals
  • Variations/Synonyms: Diana (Roman)
  • Description: She’s the twin sister of Apollo.
  • She can control nature and turn into an animal.

 

Athena 

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of wisdom, crafts, and skilled peacetime pursuits
  • Variations/Synonyms: Minerva (Roman)
  • Description: She’s an Olympian god and also known as the patroness of spinning and weaving.

 

Atropos

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Unalterable Fate
  • Variations/Synonyms: Morta (Roman)
  • Description: She’s one of the Moirai or Fates (goddesses of fate and destiny) and renders her sisters’ decisions irreversible.

 

Calliope

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of eloquence and Muse of epic poetry
  • Variations/Synonyms: Kalliope
  • Description: She’s the eldest of the Muses and often drawn with a lyre or stylus as her symbol.

 

Clio

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Muse of history
  • Variations/Synonyms: Kleio
  • Description: She is symbolized by a chest of books or an open scroll.

 

Clotho

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Spinner Fate
  • Variations/Synonyms: Nona (Roman)
  • Description: She’s one of the Moirai (Three Fates) and spins the thread of human life.

 

Cybele

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of nature, wild animals, caverns, and mountains
  • Variations/Synonyms: Cybebe, Agdistis, Magna Mater (Great Mother), Meter, or Meter Oreie
  • Description: She’s also the goddess of fertility and the protectress in times of war.

 

Demeter

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of agriculture and the growth of food plants
  • Variations/Synonyms: Ceres (Roman)
  • Description: She’s an Olympian goddess who also presides over the cycle of life and death as well as the sacred law.

 

Eos 

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan goddess of the dawn
  • Variations/Synonyms: Aurora (Roman)
  • Description: She’s the personification of the dawn.

 

Erato

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Muse of love poetry and marriage songs
  • Description: She’s known as the patron of lyric and erotic poetry or hymns.

 

Eris

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of chaos, discord, and strife
  • Variations/Synonyms: Discordia (Roman)
  • Description: She’s the daughter of Nyx (Night) and Hesiod.
  • She’s the personification of strife.

 

Euphrosyne

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of mirth, good cheer, and joy 
  • Variations/Synonyms: Euthymia or Eutychia 
  • Description: She’s one of the Graces, the daughters of Zeus and Eurynome.

 

Euterpe

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Muse of music
  • Description: She’s one of the nine Muses, the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne.
  • She’s also known as the patron of tragedy and flute playing.

 

Gaia

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Mother Earth
  • Variations/Synonyms: Gaea, Ge, or Terra (Roman)
  • Description: She’s a primordial goddess who governed the universe before the Olympian gods or the Titans existed.
  • She’s the personification of the Earth and is known as the great mother of all creation.

 

Harmonia

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of harmony and concord
  • Variations/Synonyms: Concordia (Roman)
  • Description: She’s the daughter of Ares and Aphrodite, with powers to preside over marital harmony and solving strife or discord.

 

Hebe

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of youth and the prime of life
  • Variations/Synonyms: Juventas (Roman)
  • Description: She’s the daughter of Zeus and Hera.
  • She’s also known as the cupbearer to the gods.

 

Hecate

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of angels, necromancy, sorcery, magic, entryways, herbs, and poisonous plants
  • Variations/Synonyms: Hekate or Marzanna (Slavic)
  • Description: She’s the daughter of the Titan Perses and the nymph Asteria.
  • She has dominion over the Earth, sea, and sky.

 

Hemera

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of day
  • Variations/Synonyms: Dies (Roman)
  • Description: She’s the daughter of Erebus (Darkness) and Nyx (Night).
  • She’s one of the first gods before the Titans and Olympians existed.

 

Hera

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of marriage, family, women, and childbirth
  • Variations/Synonyms: Juno (Roman)
  • Description: The daughter of Titans Cronus and Rhea, she’s one of the most powerful Olympians. She would later become the chief goddess, ruling alongside her brother-husband Zeus.

 

Hestia

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of the hearth
  • Variations/Synonyms: Vesta (Roman)
  • Description: The daughter of Cronus and Rhea, she’s one of the Olympians.
  • She’s known as a virgin goddess who swore to remain a maiden forever after Apollo and Poseidon fought over who would marry her.

 

Iris

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of the rainbow
  • Variations/Synonyms: Arcus (Roman)
  • Description: She’s the daughter of sea god Thaumas and the ocean nymph Electra.
  • She’s known as the personification of the rainbow and also as the messenger of the gods.

 

Lachesis

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Measurer Fate
  • Description: She’s one of the three Fates, goddesses of destiny and fate.
  • In Greek mythology, she decides how a mortal will live and measures how long this life will be.

 

Leto

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan goddess of motherhood, modesty, and kindness
  • Variations/Synonyms: Latona (Roman)
  • Description: She’s the mother of Apollo and ‎Artemis.
  • She has the reputation of being the gentlest in all Olympus.

 

Maia

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of springtime, warmth, and increase
  • Variations/Synonyms: Maias
  • Description: She’s a shy goddess who stays hidden in the caves of Mount Kyllene (Cyllene), where she gave birth to Hermes, her son with Zeus.

 

Megaera

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Erinye of jealousy
  • Variations/Synonyms: The Jealous One
  • Description: She’s one of the three Furies (Erinyes) who punish crimes.
  • She’s known as the goddess of vengeance against men who committed marital infidelity and relevant crimes.

 

Melpomene

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Muse of tragedy
  • Description: She’s one of the nine Muses, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne.
  • She’s symbolized by the tragic mask.

 

Metis

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan goddess of wisdom, good counsel, planning, and cunning
  • Description: She was one of Zeus’ consorts, but he swallowed her after prophecies foretold how her child would overthrow him. Unknown to him, she was already pregnant at the time. Their daughter, Athena, would emerge from his head, already full-grown and armed for war.
  • Because Metis was in Zeus’ belly and no longer existing by the time Athena was born, she’s often uncredited for her birth. But according to legend, she knew she was pregnant and already created Athena’s warrior clothes before Zeus swallowed her.

 

Mnemosyne

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan goddess of memory
  • Variations/Synonyms: Moneta (Roman)
  • Description: She’s the daughter of Uranus and Gaia.
  • She’s known for being the mother of the nine Muses, giving birth to them after Zeus stayed with her for nine consecutive nights.
  • She’s the personification of memory and remembrance.

 

Nemesis

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of retribution and divine vengeance
  • Variations/Synonyms: Rhamnousia or Rhamnusia
  • Description: She’s the goddess who helped avenge those who were wronged.

 

Nike

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of victory
  • Variations/Synonyms: Victoria (Roman)
  • Description: She’s the winged goddess of victory, honored both in war and in peaceful competition.

 

Nyx

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of the night
  • Description: She’s the personification of the night.
  • She’s known for being the only god or goddess that Zeus ever feared. He was so scared of her that he refused to enter any of her caves.

 

Persephone

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of agriculture, spring growth, and rebirth
  • Variations/Synonyms: Proserpina or Proserpine
  • Description: She’s the daughter of Zeus and Demeter.
  • As the wife of Hades, she’s also the queen of the Underworld.

 

Pheme

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of fame, renown, and gossip
  • Variations/Synonyms: Ossa or Fama (Roman)
  • Description: She’s the personification of gossip and rumor.
  • She’s the spirit of good repute and fame, but she’s also known for being the bearer of scandalous rumors. Often, she’s depicted with wings and a trumpet. 
  • According to legend, she pries into the affairs of mortals and gods alike, then repeats what she hears, starting from a dull whisper that gets louder with each repetition. So, she’s also depicted with many eyes, ears, and tongues.

 

Phoebe

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan goddess of bright intellect
  • Variations/Synonyms: Phoibe
  • Description: She’s the daughter of Uranus and Gaia.
  • She became the consort of her brother Coeus with whom she has two children: Leto and Asteria.
  • She was also known to have the gift of prophecy.

 

Polyhymnia

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Muse of sacred poetry and religious hymns 
  • Variations/Synonyms: Polymnia or Polymnis
  • Description: She’s the youngest of the Muses, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne.
  • She’s known for inventing hymns and singing these to entertain the gods and goddesses.

 

Rhea

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Great mother of the gods and the goddess of fruitfulness
  • Variations/Synonyms: Rheia or Ops (Roman)
  • Description: She’s the daughter of Uranus and Gaia.
  • She’s also the consort of her brother Cronus with whom she bore Zeus, Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Hades, and Poseidon.

 

Selene

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of the Moon
  • Variations/Synonyms: Luna (Roman)
  • Description: She’s depicted as a beautiful woman who drives her moon chariot across the sky.
  • She’s the personification of the moon and is the sister of Helios (Sun) and Eos (Dawn).

 

Terpsichore

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Muse of dance
  • Description: She’s one of the Muses, daughters of Zeus with Mnemosyne.
  • According to legend, she’s the mother of the Sirens with the river god Achelous.

 

Tethys

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Goddess of freshwater
  • Description: She’s the daughter of Uranus and Gaia.
  • She’s also the consort of her brother Oceanus. She bore three thousand river gods and another three thousand Oceanids (ocean nymphs), including Metis.

 

Thalassa

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Primordial goddess of the sea 
  • Description: She’s the daughter of Aether (Upper Sky) and Hemera (Light).
  • Together with her consort, sea god Pontus, they populated the ocean with the tribes of fish and the Telchines (storm gods).

 

Thalia

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Muse of comedy, good cheer, and idyllic poetry
  • Variations/Synonyms: Thaleia
  • Description: She’s one of the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, collectively known as the Muses.
  • There’s another goddess named Thalia. She’s one of the Graces (Charites), the daughters of Zeus and Eurynome. She’s the goddess of festivity and rich banquets.

 

Thea

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan goddess of sight, the light of the blue sky, and shining elements
  • Variations/Synonyms: Euryphaessa or Theia 
  • Description: She’s the daughter of Uranus and Gaia.
  • She’s also known as the mother of Helios (Sun), Eos (Dawn), and Selene (Moon).

 

Themis

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Titan goddess of justice, order, and wisdom
  • Description: She’s the mother of the Moirai (Fates) and the Horae (Hours).
  • She’s the personification of justice and is the interpreter of the gods’ will.

 

Tisiphone

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Erinye avenger of murder
  • Variations/Synonyms: Tilphousia
  • Description: She’s one of the Erinyes and was tasked to punish crimes of murder, including homicide, parricide (killing a parent), and fratricide (killing a sibling).

 

Urania

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Muse of astronomy and universal love
  • Variations/Synonyms: Ourania
  • Description: She’s one of the Muses, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne.
  • According to legend, she inherited her father’s majesty and got her grace from her mother.

 

 

 

as seen on
We Got You, Mama.

Self-Care Rituals & Self-Love Practices To Support You & Your Family.

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