Diagnosis: Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction

The Pubic Symphysis is a small but crucial joint at the very front joining the pubis bones of the left and right sides. It’s a very strong cartilaginous joint (to be precise it is secondary cartilaginous). This joint allows very little movement. Towards the very end of pregnancy and through labor and delivery the relaxin hormone is released which loosens up the joints and allows them to stretch so the baby can be delivered. For some unfortunate women, the relaxin hormone is produced much earlier than needed and this can cause the condition I have called Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction.

That very strong and tough cartilage joining the pubis bones has loosened up significantly causing my pubis bones to wiggle in and out of their socket with the slightest provocation. It causes me a lot of pain. Regular chiropractic treatment helps to relieve some of it temporarily but there isn’t any cure for the condition. Once Babe is born, my body should stop producing relaxin and I should be OK. That is, as long as there’s no permanent damage. The likelihood of permanent damage is supposed to be quite low so no one is too worried about it right now.

“A related condition is diastasis symphysis pubis (DSP), in which the gap in the pubic joint widens too far. The average gap between the bones in a non-pregnant woman is between 4mm and 5mm. During pregnancy it’s normal for this gap to widen by 2mm or 3mm. If the gap is 10mm or more, DSP is diagnosed. It’s rare, and can only be identified by X-ray.” http://www.babycentre.co.uk/a546492/pelvic-pain-spd#ixzz2JlYw2lhi

What it all boils down to is that this is a serious condition that will hopefully resolve itself but definitely is to be monitored just in case it becomes a bigger issue. Fingers crossed that I am in the majority and have no long-term problems!

More information:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphysis_pubis_dysfunction
http://www.whattoexpect.com/pregnancy/symptoms-and-solutions/symphysis-pubic-dysfunction.aspx
http://www.babycentre.co.uk/a546492/pelvic-pain-spd
http://ptjournal.apta.org/content/85/12/1290.long
http://www.pelvicinstability.org.uk/faq.asp
http://www.pelvicinstability.org.uk/index.asp?pageid=74237

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